Should Students Still Be Taught Cursive Writing

In a world ruled by technology is there any room for traditional handwriting? A big debate right now is whether we should be focusing on keyboard skills over handwriting skills, specifically cursive. Yes, it is a dying art, but we have so many historical documents in cursive if we don’t teach the younger generation, will they lose the part of our language?

Handwriting is a complex skill which engages the cognitive, perceptual and motor skills simultaneously. It is no doubt handwriting plays a large role in the educational development of a child. But can it be replaced by the modern keyboard?

5 Reasons why Cursive Handwriting Should Stay

1. Handwriting makes us better writers and spellers and can help predict academic success.

Mother and daughter helping daughter with her homework

Handwriting aids in the development of fine motor skills. The hand uses muscles in a different way than when writing in print. Our hand become multilingual, when a child learns cursive, they learn the alphabet in a whole new light. When a child does not learn cursive, a language barrier is created in their native language.

Learning to handwrite is a key component in improving both reading and written composition. Often children are able to write much faster and neater in cursive opposed to print.

Learning to handwrite is a key component in improving both reading and written composition. When a child is taught using a keyboard and programs, spelling and grammar are often overlooked, as the program corrects it for them.

2. Writing things down boost memory

Taking notes by hand instead of typing them helps a person process what they are learning, they are able to phrase it in ways to help them better understand and remember.

Studies show college students remembered content better one week later if they had written it in cursive than when they printed or typed. 

It is also easier on the eyes to read and focus on literature when it is written on paper compared to on a screen.

3. Handwritten letters are more personal and meaningful

Dare to dream. Handwritten greeting card. Printable quote template. Calligraphic vector illustration. T-shirt print design.Cursive has a great ability to both being artistic and highly personal. Everyone creates their own personal spin through their handwriting.

By taking the time to personally write out a letter, instead of quickly typing it on a computer, it sends a message that what you are saying is important to you.

Cursive writing sparks creativity. Do you remember as a child looking at your parents signature in awe? Teaching your child this art gives them confidence in a new ability and gives them the tools to create their own signature they can be proud of. A great signature is something even adults swoon over.

4. Helps children focus

 

 

5. Improves confidence
Being able to read and write clearly improved the student’s confidence, enabling them to communicate with others in an effective manner. When a child is sure of themselves in their reading and writing it will translate to their schooling. Showing an overall academic improvement.

168671-OVJQ6B-559

The world is so emersed in technology, children will naturally learn how to type and use computer programs. Taking the time to teach a child the traditional way of writing would be beneficial in so many ways. This dying art should stay in our school systems.

Fun Fact!

Beautiful flowers decorated label with text Thank You.
Some people that suffer from brain injuries that damage their ability to write to understanding print, but their ability to understand cursive remains. It is suggested the cursive can be used to help children with learning disabilities such as dyslexia.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.