7 Ways to Make Reading Fun!

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you’ll go.” ~ Dr. Seuss


Jumping into a good book is like taking your mind on an amazing expedition. Through
reading and writing, anything is possible. Creating worlds with talking animals, alternate universes, aliens and more!

Unfortunately, not everyone has a natural taste for reading. Depending on a child’s learning style, reading and writing may feel more like a chore. As a parent, it is your job to convince them reading is fun! This may be difficult, but there are many ways to encourage a child to love reading.

How can we ignite a child’s passion for reading?


Read the Right Book


Choose or let your child pick a book that they can relate too. If they play sports, love camping or dancing, for example, find a book that encompasses those topics.
mom and daughte

Books are more enjoyable to read when you’re interested in the topic and want to know more.

Choose a book that is on your child’s reading level. Sometimes reading can be overwhelming when you don’t understand the words or is too long for them. A simple way to tell if a book is on your child’s reading level is by using the five finger rule. Read the first page, and have your child hold up a finger for every word they don’t know. If they don’t understand five or more words, they may not be ready to read that book yet. That is okay! Everyone learns at his or her own pace and overbook they read improves their reading level!

Read a variety of material – stories, poems, information books, newspaper articles and comics for your child. Show them all the forms literature comes in. Maybe they would prefer to read short stories and poems instead of chapter books?

 

Create a Reading Space

Finding a quiet place to sit down and read a book is a great start a habit of settling down and focusing on reading. Create a calm and inviting environment where your child feels completely comfortable spending time with their favourite characters, and getting lost in a beautiful story. This should be a place where their imagination can run wild.

Lead by example! Make time for yourself to read a book as well. Go to your reading place and read your books silently together. This is also a great way for family bonding time.

My little bookcase has a wonderful list of reading space ideas here.

189532-OXJZFK-606

Bring the Book to Life 

Try and plan ahead if the book is spooky and Halloween related, dress up in costume and read it by flashlight. If it about going to the beach, read it at the beach! By doing this, you’re bringing another element to the story. Visual and kinesthetic learners really connect when they feel physically involved.

Three vintage witches perform magic ritualWhen reading a story with dialogue change voices or share the reading by assigning a character to each reader.

Ask questions about what they are reading! How do they feel about the characters? What do you think will happen next? Can they relate to the characters? As your child becomes more familiar with books and reading, ask questions about the structure. Who is the protagonist? When you ask questions and discuss what they are reading it makes them think and question what they just read helping their reading comprehension.

Many books now have apps and videos you can watch and play along with. For an introduction to book and reading, W5Go’s app on books and reading explains the many kinds of books and reading material available and when we use each one.


Library Dates

Set a day once or twice a month where you go to the library to discover a new book. Make a date of it, grab a hot cocoa and settle in for some family bonding time! Also, many libraries offer programs for kids or reading clubs your child can join!270249

Bringing a child to a library promotes being social and creates a sense of community. They can see a world of different books, and meet new people that also enjoy reading. The library community helps a child feel more comfortable with talking about what they are reading, their thoughts and feelings about a book. Joining book clubs is a great way for children to discuss and learn about how everyone views things differently. We learn more by discussing and talking about what we’ve seen or read.

 

Make it A Challenge 

Some children are really motivated by challenges and find it really fun to complete a task. So make a game out of it! How many books can they read over the summer?

Mback to shcoolaybe offer a prize like ice cream for finishing a book.

Make a chart counting the books they’ve read. According to SMART goals, people are more likely to achieve a goal, such as finishing a book, if they can physically see and track their progress. You can start off small such as a chapter every two weeks. By making it a challenge, a child can practice planning and setting goals to achieve them. It instills a habit of making time to read and set aside time to accomplish a goal.

Often libraries will release summer book series challenges, and there are plenty online to choose from. My KidsTime has a great list of summer books and challenges for kids here.

Be Creative!

While reading the book take time to draw, paint, act or model scenes they’ve read. This helps children comprehend what they have read, and be able to retell the story to others. Use voices while reading aloud to make the book more interesting. Have your child create a voice and read along pretending to be the character.
296642-P74CHQ-617
Try and find books that have movie adaptions or plays made about them. Read the book and reward it with a trip to the theatre and watch the show together. Make a family date of it, grab a treat after and discuss how the show compared to the book. 

Come together with fellow parents and create a book club with your children. When they finish a book together throw a themed party for the kids to talk about the story. If they have a birthday coming up have it themed around their favourite book. Have fun with it! Make costumes or crafts, bake food mentioned in the stories.

Break the Rules!

Some rules are meant to be broken. Allow them to stay up a bit later to finish that chapter in a book. Read to them even if they can read on their own. Hearing others read helps with pronunciation. Let them move around while you read. For kinesthetic learners, this may help them listen and understand what the story is about. 

reading

Reading yields so many benefits for a growing mind, encouraging a child to read is like giving them the keys to the city. So go ahead give them the key and open the doors to possibilities! 

Books and Reading

W5Go’s Books and Reading app is an easy, fun way to introduce your child to the wonders of reading! Enjoy an exciting adventure in augmented & virtual reality, exploring the W5Go secret library, learning the who, what, where, when and why’s of books!

Books_Reading01_2019

 

 

Google Play 

App Store

Slide Me

booksandreadingTitle

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Goal-Setting for Children

 

What is a goal?

A goal is an object of a person’s ambition or effort; an aim or desired result. Statistics say 92% of people never achieve their goals. This could be because they have not effectively planed their goals, and when you fail to plan, you plan to fail.

It is very important to teach your children how to plan and achieve their goals so they can get what they truly want in life.

What goal-setting teaches them:

  • How to Stay Motivated
  • Healthy habits
  • Responsibility
  • Persistence
  • Adaptability
  • Problem-Solving
  • Self-Worth

A simple way to start planning a goal is to fill out a SMART sheet.  Fun fact! By writing your goals down you are 42% more likely to achieve them. Smart Goals

Is Your Goal SMART?

Specific? 

Do you know exactly what you want to achieve?

Measurable?

Can you track your progress? Being able to see progress is a great way to say motivated and stick to your goal.

Attainable?

Is the goal reasonable? Not something too hard such as climbing Mount Everest next Saturday or something to easy like

Relevant?

Is it important to you? Will it help you in the future? Something you are proud of?

Time? 

When do you want this goal to be completed by?

For example, your child wants to read the Harry Potter books (Specific). How many books are in a series? (Measurable). Will they be able to read the books on their own or with some help? (Attainable). Are they interest in reading and the stories of Harry Potter? (Relevant) They want to read them before they get to a certain grade or perhaps the end of summer (Time).

Great goal setting activities for children would be; reading a chapter book, planting a garden or something as simple as organizing their toys.

How to Teach Goal-Setting

Determine the goal: Ask your child what they would like to do with questions like. What would you like to achieve this summer?  What would you like to learn?

Discuss the purpose: Why would you like to do this? Will this help others? How will completing this goal make you feel?

Break the goal down into smaller steps. Write down the steps they need to take to achieve their goal. A flow chart is a great visual way they can track their progress.

Say they want to read a 14-chapter book on their own. Try reading a chapter a week, maybe an hour before bed. Ask them questions about what they are reading, what they like and dislike about the characters or stories.  This is a simple way to encourage them to stay motivated.

Goal_Steps

Plan for obstacles. Things can and will happen, we can brainstorm what could possibly happen. What if they don’t have time to read some nights? Can they read for an extra half hour another night or twice as long on weekend? What if they lose the book? We can look for it for a week, find it or borrow another copy from a library.

Talk about it! Telling others about your goals helps keep you on track. Others will ask you how your goal is going, what’s next and help keep you focused.

Monkey see monkey do: Children are great imitators and learn so much from their parents. If you verbalize your goals to your children try your best to follow through with them. If you told your child you are going to start walking more. Make a plan and follow through with it. They learn from seeing your plan and achieve your goals too!

Create group goals for the family and set out to achieve them as a family. For instance, you would like to do a 5k walk for a charity. You will need to find out when the event is, how much you would like to raise for the charity, how you will raise the money, what kind of training you will do and when you will do it. By planning out your 5k charity walk with your children they will see how much effort and reward there is in completing a goal. Completing goals as a family encourages teamwork, family bonding and creates beautiful memories.

I Want to Give Up!

Sometimes goals take time and children often want to see results now. They could feel discouraged because they are not progressing at the rate they want. If your child feels like giving up talk to them ask them why they feel this way. Remind them why they started, how important it was to them. Show them how far they have come and encourage them to keep going.  If it is an obstacle in their way help them to overcome it, show them the how they can improvise and problem solves to get over this hurdle. Sometimes all it takes is a bit of cheerleading to help reassure them that they are on the right path and can do it!

OFDZ6O0

We Did It! 

When they have completed a goal celebrate with them. If they finished the book have a movie night and watch the film version. Maybe have pizza, cake or a trip to the beach. Ask them how they feel, what challenges they faced and what they would have done differently. Hindsight is 20/20! It is a good learning exercise to reflect on what they have done, where they can improve and what they have learned.

Almost!

Sometimes we aim for goals and we don’t quite achieve them. Say they wanted an “A+” on their science test but only reached a “B”. This is the time to teach them it is okay to fail and how they can learn from this and achieve their goals next time. A good trait to instill in a child is to be resilience. Yes, they will be upset they failed and that is okay! Talk to them about why they think they failed, where they can improve and what they plan on doing next time.